We Know How Kids Learn to Read– But What About Math?

The science of reading tells us that novices learn to read through explicit and systematic instruction in decoding of words. The same cognitive principles that guide the science of reading are those that undergird all knowledge acquisition for novices, in the case of this post, specifically math. This post aims to distill some of the … Continue reading We Know How Kids Learn to Read– But What About Math?

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Being a First Year Teacher is Hard– But Not for the Reasons You Think.

This post  is less of a reflection on research and more  just reflecting on my first official school year. There will be a mix of both research, researchED, and teacher-life stuff in the upcoming school year. Everyone talks about the excitement at the start of the school year. Getting back into schools, seeing students, and … Continue reading Being a First Year Teacher is Hard– But Not for the Reasons You Think.

Research into Practice: How I’m Planning to Teach Reading

***updated 8/31/2019 for typos and clarity As I begin my first year as a teacher of record (yay!)I'm hoping to apply some principles of reading that I’ve learned over the past year to my classroom. This post will be dedicated to how I plan to approach reading with 10th and 12th graders (year 11 and … Continue reading Research into Practice: How I’m Planning to Teach Reading

Reading Less to Read Better: Multi-Cueing Systems and the Surge of Graphic Novels

In my teaching literature methods course last fall, we read Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese in anticipation of a lesson prepared by some of my classmates. The novel is a thick book, almost 240 pages, but it took less than 25 minutes to read it. I encountered several pages with just pictures, and pages … Continue reading Reading Less to Read Better: Multi-Cueing Systems and the Surge of Graphic Novels

Rethinking Independent Reading and “Just Right” Texts: The Continuing Case for Whole-Class Literacy Instruction

"Have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?" That the river is everywhere at the same time... and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past nor the shadow of the future"  The above quote is from Herman Hesse's Siddhartha. I remember … Continue reading Rethinking Independent Reading and “Just Right” Texts: The Continuing Case for Whole-Class Literacy Instruction

Should We Make Our Lessons Relevant?

As a result of students feeling bored and education being deemed “irrelevant” to their immediate lives, a number of tactics have been introduced as antidotes to the boring, outdated, factory model of schooling. We can either give 100% choice of low-level young adult fiction books featuring diverse characters, or as in Peter Greene’s recent Forbes … Continue reading Should We Make Our Lessons Relevant?

Curating Text Sets to Build Background Knowledge and Boost Reading Comprehension

This post is a part of a series I’m writing about the evidence based instructional practices I implemented in student teaching. This is post #2. You can read post #1 here: Simple, Not Easy: How giving my students space to think improved engagement and learning.   Because of the power dynamic in schools,  students often … Continue reading Curating Text Sets to Build Background Knowledge and Boost Reading Comprehension

Simple, Not Easy: How Giving My Students the Space to Think Improved Engagement and Learning

Student-teaching is over. We submitted our final essays on To Kill a Mockingbird, and all that is left is to watch the movie, and do end-of-the-year stuff next week. Now that I’m here, I can finally stop and reflect on what I’ve done over the past few months-- my trial run if you will. I … Continue reading Simple, Not Easy: How Giving My Students the Space to Think Improved Engagement and Learning

Fighting For The Schools Our Kids Deserve

As I finish my student teaching stint and move toward having my own classroom, two things have been on my mind: deficit thinking and the phrase “the schools our kids deserve”. This was brought to light by the 8 Black Hands podcast about the teacher strikes in LA and Tom Rademacher and Robert Pondiscio’s twitter … Continue reading Fighting For The Schools Our Kids Deserve